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Staffordshire Fire & Rescue Service - Preventing, Protecting, Responding

Teenage Caveman Not Cool!

Teenage Caveman
Firefighter Kyle Brookes and two of the Teenage Caveman characters help launch a new video raising awareness of the penalties of deliberately setting grass fires

A new video targeting teenage fire-setters and raising awareness of the penalty they face if convicted, is launched today by Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service.  

“Starting a grass fire, however small, is a crime and will be treated as such....arsonists face a criminal record and severe penalties, including a prison sentence of up to two years.” Glynn Luznyj, Head of Risk Prevention.

The Teenage Caveman story is an animated film about a group of young people who get bored and think about starting a grass fire. Watch it to find out why only those with a caveman’s brain would think setting fires is cool. 

Every year, firefighters are called out to deal with hundreds of grass, tree and rubbish fires that are deliberately started – and evidence shows the number increases during school holidays. 

During the Easter school holiday alone, the Service dealt with 187 small fires across the county.   

Teenage Caveman aims to get across the hard-hitting message that anyone convicted of arson faces a maximum fine of £5,000 or a prison sentence of up to two years. The video, which is part of the Service’s Flames Aren’t Games campaign, has been posted on social media channels, plasma screens in fire stations and on the Service’s website and will as used in fire prevention work in schools.  

Life-sized Teenage Cavemen cut-outs will also be at the Staffordshire County Show on May 29 and 30 and visitors will have the chance to design their own caveman character using an interactive board. 

Head of Risk Reduction, Glynn Luznyj said: “Starting a grass fire, however small, is a crime and will be treated as such. We work with Staffordshire Police to do everything possible to find and punish those who deliberately waste our time and resources and endanger lives and property by starting fires maliciously. 

“Arsonists face a criminal record and severe penalties, including a prison sentence of up to two years.”

He added that when firefighters were tied up dealing with a deliberate grass fire, they were unavailable to attend a genuine emergency such as a house fire or serious road accident and the delay could cost someone their life.   

The Service’s Flames Aren’t Games campaign includes visiting schools and youth clubs and engaging with as many youngsters as possible to warn them of the dangers of setting grass fires and the devastating effect they have on the environment.

Watch the Teenage Caveman video at http://youtu.be/xINXFdZyh1M