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Staffordshire Fire & Rescue Service - Preventing, Protecting, Responding

Celebrating the past, present and future of the fire service

14/11/2014

Fire appliance
Fire engine

A trio of drop-in sessions will be held at Hugo Meynell Primary School to celebrate the past, present and future of Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service.

"There is a far greater emphasis on education nowadays and an understanding that knowledge is the key to reducing the number of incidents that we attend. That is why it is really important to go into schools to meet the children and explain what we do as a Service and why we do it. These drop-in sessions are also a great way for us to meet the parents and even grandparents and to give out potentially life-saving advice." 

Ashley Watch Manager Keith Davies

Pupils will be creating art work to represent the way the Service has evolved since Ashley Fire Station first opened its doors in 1967.

They will be joined by pupils from St Mary’s Church of England Primary School in Mucklestone on Tuesday, November 18.

Their designs will eventually be showcased in the new community fire station which is being built in nearby Loggerheads and is due to become operational next year.

Firefighters and Community Safety Officers will be on hand offering winter home and road safety advice during the events from 10.30am-11.15am, 2.15pm-3.15pm and 5pm-6pm.

They are urging people to bring items that they think could be included in a time capsule which will be buried at the new site on Market Drayton Road.

A poster competition will also be launched, and the winning pictures will be put in the time capsule which will be opened in 50 years’ time. Book vouchers will be awarded to the creators of the best four posters.

Local historian Martin Holdcroft will be providing an insight into the rich and diverse heritage of Ashley and Loggerheads.

Ashley Watch Manager Keith Davies, who will move to Loggerheads when it opens, said: "Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service has undergone a major transformation since I started more than 30 years ago and the new community fire station will reflect the changes that we have seen, allowing us to continue providing a first class service to our communities.

"There is a far greater emphasis on education nowadays and an understanding that knowledge is the key to reducing the number of incidents that we attend. That is why it is really important to go into schools to meet the children and explain what we do as a Service and why we do it. These drop-in sessions are also a great way for us to meet the parents and even grandparents and to give out potentially life-saving advice."