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Staffordshire Fire & Rescue Service - Preventing, Protecting, Responding

Pupils learn about the perils of playing with fire

10/03/2015

Arson prevention
Flames Aren't Games

Hundreds of pupils in Stoke-on-Trent will learn about the perils of playing with fire as part of a high profile campaign.

"The work we are doing with schools across the city is absolutely vital in helping us to tackle grass fires. By educating pupils from a young age, they become aware of the risks they face if they deliberately set fires. They are not only putting their own lives in danger, other innocent people could also be harmed."

Donna Broadhead - Prevention Manager for the north of the county

Community Safety Officers will be visiting schools across the city to talk to young people about the risks involved in setting grass fires in the run up to the Easter holiday.

The events are part of the hugely successful Flames Aren’t Games initiative which has seen the number of small fires being set drop dramatically since it as launched in 2011.

In the north of the county, there were 505 such incidents between April 1 and August 31 2014. This compares to 773 over the same period of time in 2013 and 959 in 2011.

The figures for 2012 are not comparable due to the extremely wet weather during the summer months.

The CSOs will visit:

•    Parkhall Primary in Longton on March 12
•    St Joseph’s College in Trent Vale on March 12
•    Co-operative Academy on March 12         
•    Discovery Academy in Bentilee on March 16
•    Blurton Primary in Blurton on March 23
•    Haywood High in Burslem on April 1               

Donna Broadhead, Prevention Manager for the north of the county, said: "The work we are doing with schools across the city is absolutely vital in helping us to tackle grass fires. By educating pupils from a young age, they become aware of the risks they face if they deliberately set fires. They are not only putting their own lives in danger, other innocent people could also be harmed.

"This type of incident could also potentially divert firefighters from other blazes or road traffic collisions, which in the worst case scenario could see lives lost. The culprits could also face a fine of up to £5,000 or two years in prison as well as negatively affecting their future career prospects."