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Staffordshire Fire & Rescue Service - Preventing, Protecting, Responding

Flames Aren't Games Winner Announced

Spencer Mountford aged 12 from Longton receiving his prize from firefighter Dan Fenton

Hundreds of teenagers across the county took part in Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service’s Flames Aren’t Games PlayStation4 Competition, with one lucky winner from Longton scooping the prize.

“The microsite is a great vehicle for communicating key safety messages to young people. Its popularity means fire safety messages reach a lot of teenagers across the county and further afield."

Director of Response Rob Barber

Spencer Mountford was picked at random from over 200 people under 18 who entered the competition to win the games console.

The contest was featured on a microsite which showcased the Teenage Caveman video. The aim of the initiative was to raise awareness of the consequences that teenage fire-setters could face if they were caught and convicted of starting fires.

Spencer, aged 12, from Stoke on Trent, said he was delighted to have been awarded the prize: “I was really surprised to learn I had won the PlayStation 4. The Teenage Caveman microsite is great fun as well as being informative. The video really makes you think about the consequences of starting a fire and how easily and quickly it can spread.”

Director of Response Rob Barber added: “The microsite is a great vehicle for communicating key safety messages to young people. Its popularity means fire safety messages reach a lot of teenagers across the county and further afield.

“A grass fire can quickly spread and for every call we receive about a grass fire there could be a person elsewhere in urgent need of our assistance. The campaign has been a great success since it was launched in 2011.”

The Service always sees an increase in grass fires during periods when children are not at school.  Informing young people about the risks involved in setting small fires, such as diverting frontline resources from other potentially life-threatening incidents, as well as informing them of the possible consequences – a fine of up to £5,000, is key to its success.

ENDS