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Firefighters rescue Bambi and Donald

January 31 2019

Firefighters from Burton on Trent were busy yesterday (Wednesday, 30 January 2019) saving the local wildlife.

We’ve done this sort of thing quite often over the years, but our apprentice firefighter, Matt Setterfield, who joined us 3 weeks ago, was keen to get involved. He can’t believe he’s already had so many interesting work stories to tell his children

Blue Watch Manager, Steve Marsh

First thing yesterday morning, a muntjack deer followed an employee in to the yard at Burton Fire Station. As the automatic gates closed behind the animal it became very distressed, so firefighters from blue watch and other colleagues tried to save it from hurting itself by trying to manoeuvre it to safety. After some time, they were able to corral the deer and steer into a garage out of harm’s way. 

Once safely contained, colleagues from the RSPCA came to collect the deer to take it for a check up before releasing it in a safe location. 

However, later in the morning at 11.17 am, the same crew was called to help the RSPCA and the Service’s Water Rescue Team from Tamworth to rescue a duck that had become stuck on frozen ice at Branston Water Park. 

Watch Manager Steve Marsh said: “It was a bit of a surprise to see a deer in the station’s ground at 8am yesterday morning! As it was trying to get out again it was obviously very frightened. We couldn’t let it out as we’re in the middle of the town and surrounded by busy roads. We were getting concerned about it as it kept crashing against our fencing. It wasn’t badly injured, but had cut its nose, we didn’t want it to hurt itself any further which is why we guided it towards the garage. Our partner from the RSPCA took it to be checked out by a vet and said it would be released again later. 

“It was the same RSPCA employee who called for our help with the duck a bit later in the morning. The poor thing had become frozen on the water about 20 -30 feet away from the bank, which was just a bit too far for their net to reach. It was quite an easy job for one of our firefighters to put on a dry suit and wade a few feet into the water so the net could reach. Once we’d scooped the duck and got it back onto dry land, it only needed a bit of a rub of its tummy to warm it up and it sprang back to life.” 

“We’ve done this sort of thing quite often over the years, but our apprentice firefighter, Matt Setterfield, who joined us 3 weeks ago, was keen to get involved. He can’t believe he’s already had so many interesting work stories to tell his children.”